106 Agreement With Ribble Valley Council

“The Council has put forward development proposals for the next five years that meet the requirement of a five-year land supply. In particular, the market threatens to be saturated in Whalley, Clitheroe and Longridge, the main urban centres where it is difficult to show a need, except for elderly drinkers and rental housing. In some of our rural villages, there is an argument for small developments, including affordable housing, that help preserve villages by keeping shops, pubs, schools and communal halls open. “Officials are working closely with colleagues at Lancashire County Council to ensure that funds are spent as quickly as possible on the programmes listed.” The planning policy of the central government is defined primarily in the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF). Originally published in 2012, it was revised in July 2018 by the Ministry of Housing, Municipalities and Local Government and, again, in February 2019, along with updated guidelines on planning practices that support the FNPP. “We have already exceeded our 20-year target by 356, which makes the core strategy unnecessary. Currently, developers contribute to the company through Section 106 agreements, but unfortunately, the money is never spent on areas for which it was intended. “This program includes up to 7 km of new and improved green links in the district, as well as upgrades to playgrounds and play equipment, as well as infrastructure improvements for parks with associated regeneration work. You said: “The process behind the issuance of s106 money is a complex area and is subject to many factors that are often beyond the Control of the Council. The money must be returned to the developers if it is not used within the time limits agreed by law in the agreements referred to in Article 106. Cllr Stephen Atkinson, Vice-President of Ribble Valley Borough Council, said: “Previously, not enough has been done to commit to the provision of 106 programmes and funds. This is a great opportunity for governors and parents, especially for watersheds, to engage and lobby for the development or provision of new schools. The Conservative group of Ribble Valley Borough Council intends to make it a central part of our election platform and we look forward to working with policy groups to facilitate the development of new educational infrastructure, both in Clitheroe and elsewhere in the Ribble Valley.

Now that most of the new housing has been granted building permits as part of the main strategy, the focus will be increasingly on infrastructure needs and how to improve the lives of the people of Ribble Valley. Section 106 Money the Council has received over the past five years, which has not been spent – and what projects are for: Studies conducted by the Ribble Valley Borough Council Conservative Group with District Councillor Susie Charles, a member of the Children, Youth and Schools Cabinet, show that there has been a dramatic acceleration in funds raised by the New Conservative Administration in County Hall since 2017. In just 17 short months, the new Conservative County Hall government raised £3,452,820.91 out of 106 agreements with developers, 3,251,198.72 (94.16%) already promised for active educational infrastructure programmes. . . .